Questioning the Question

Thinking carefully about a research question before diving in can help to a) highlight what I already know and b) define what, precisely, I want to answer with my research.

Try to Prove Yourself Wrong

If we honestly try to find flaws in our assumptions and in our theories with every piece of evidence we examine, and if our hypothesis stands, then we can feel much more confident that we have come to a reasonable conclusion.

Adding up indirect evidence – and grabbing all those bits of information

I love finding stuff like this. My husband’s grandmother, Dorothy (Keane) Burns, was listed in the 1930 U.S. Census as a little girl (age 5), niece of the head of household (Edmund Sweeney), and living at 523 West 135th Street in Manhattan, New York.1 Also in the household were: Ellen Sweeney, Edmund’s wife (age 36,... Continue Reading →

Refining a Research Strategy

The start of my genealogical "research" a couple of decades ago consisted mostly of reading through things my family had done already and drawing pedigrees of my ancestors. At some point, my dad and I visited cemeteries where we knew family should be, took some pictures, and added a few names and dates to our... Continue Reading →

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